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Beer consumption still high despite recession – Beer parlour owners

A group of Nigerian men drink beer and listen to television updates on the election results, at the Flexx Bush Bar and Lounge in the Sabon Gari neighborhood of Kano, Nigeria, Monday, March 30, 2015. Nigerians are waiting in hope and fear for results of the most tightly contested presidential election in the nation's turbulent history. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

The tough economic situation across the country has stirred reactions and lamentations from many Nigerians, but beer lovers still congregate daily at beer parlours despite the complaints of intolerable hardship in the country. 

Most beer lovers make smart choices when it comes to beer consumption today as they can’t afford to stay home without consuming what they love. There are many beer brands for reasonable price depending on what your budget permits you to consume. 

Having less money can make it difficult to buy the beer you really like. This is why many beer lovers in the country now opt for cheaper beer products.

In Encomium Weekly’s findings, beer parlour owners in this chat revealed how customers have been coping with the hike in the prices of beer brands and why many prefer cheaper beer brands to what they used to take.

 

Mrs. Clara

Beer prices have changed to what we used to buy before the recession. A bottle of big Stout now goes for N400, while the small size is N300. Many of those who consume 3 to 5 bottles before can no longer afford it. I sell more of Legend stout now because it’s cheaper to Guinness stout. I hardly sell products like Heineken here because customers will not buy. It remains one of the most expensive beer brands that people can’t afford. A bottle of Heineken now goes for N500 and l think it remains one of the few products that l hardly sell here. Customers now make smart choices. Instead of buying less for more, they prefer buying more for less. Instead of spending N500 on a bottle of beer, they will buy 3 bottles of Dubic or Satzenbrau beer for the same N500.

 

Iya Lara Spot

My customers are always coming around to enjoy cold beer here everyday. Though there’s recession in the country, as a business woman I have learn to adjust with the current situation of the country. Many of my customers have changed their beer taste just because they can’t afford to drink what they used to drink. I sell more of Trophy beer brand here daily. Since the beginning of this year, it remains the only brand that I sell mostly because that’s what a lot of customers demand and it’s  affordable. A bottle of Trophy is N200, while others are N250-N300. Dubic beer, Satzenbrau, and Trophy still remain the cheapest which many people can’t do without these days.

 

Ifianyi Ken (Kelechi Cool Spot)

People still drink but not as much as they used to. Many of our customers now prefer to patronize paraga joints because they are relatively cheap and affordable compared to beer. As you can see, I have also started the sales of paraga drinks along with beer just to gain the attention of customers who can no longer afford the prices of beer. My customers now patronise beer or paraga. Mostly cheap beer brands. Few people among my customers still prefer the expensive brands, especially when football matches are live. I make more sales anytime football matches are played. The spirit of football brings more sales as customers normally order their favourite brands and even drink more on match days.

 

Ngozi Eket (Grace bar)

Alcoholic products are still very much in good shape in Nigeria. Many customers, especially the young ones patronise beer drinks more here. Not everyone prefers to change taste just because of the price. I have people that still patronise the expensive beer brands that they love to drink and I also have customers that now opt for cheaper products just because of the price. Either cheap ones or not, beer consumption still fly high and I wouldn’t say the recession has affected my sales here.

  • Soewu Oluwafemi

 

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