Celebrity, Interviews

Recap: OJB’s last interview, speaks on Nomoreloss’ death


Music maker, Olumuyiwa Osinuga, popularly known as Nomoreloss passed on in Lagos recently and threw the entertainment industry into mourning. The singer was hospitalized for two weeks in January after being diagnosed of typhoid fever. He was discharged and recuperating before his demise on Monday, March 21, 2016. The late singer championed the fund raising campaign to save OJB Jezreel’s life.

In July 2013, veteran music producer, OJB Jezreel revealed to Nigerians that his kidneys had stopped working and he had just few months to live if nothing was done about his situation

“God willing, I have like eight to 10 weeks to get the transplant done. It’s strange, I still walk around a little, I can’t eat much though, I trust God and Nigerians for their financial support,” he said during his travails.

The late singer, Olumuyiwa Osinuga took it upon himself to champion the cause to save OJB’s life. He rallied funds and went to TV stations to speak about the producer’s dwindling health condition as chairman OJB Donation Committee. Many people came to OJB’s rescue and $100,000 was raised. OJB went to India for a transplant in August, 2013, and today he is alive.

ENCOMIUM Weekly on Friday, March 25, 2016, had an interview with OJB Jezreel about the death of his friend, Nomoreloss, how he is recuperating and much more…


How did you react when you heard about the death of your friend, Nomoreloss?


Olumuyiwa Osinuga

It was shocking. They say everybody is going to die, but there are some people you find it very impossible to believe when you hear they are dead. There are some people if they tell you they are going to die, you will say no, it is not possible. So, I was completely in shock. I turned off my phones immediately for like a day or two. I didn’t want people to get in touch with me because I didn’t want to break the news that Nomoreloss was dead.

How close were you to him?

His music career started in my hands way back in 1995, 1996, it’s over 20 years of closeness. That was how long we knew ourselves.

What are your fondest memories of him?

He was a very humorous person, that is what I will say. He had a way of making everything funny even in a serious situation. He had a way of stirring you up. I think these are the memories I cannot forget.  H was a selfless person. He would do anything for anybody. Even if it warrants removing his eyes, he wouldn’t raise any objection. He was a very selfless person

What will you miss about him?

What I will miss is when I look at the industry and the profession we are today, I don’t think you will find two people who are down to earth and very sincere that want to help genuinely with no strings attached like Nomoreloss. I will miss that part of him. He was exceptionally kind and ever willing to help.

How did you get to know about his sickness?

The truth about it is that somebody had malaria and typhoid. It is not something that you would announce to the public. It was not something you spread because it is not worth it. Let me give you an example. Weeks before his death, we spoke. It wasn’t like he was in a serious sickness. He said I am a bit down with malaria, I am a bit down with typhoid. It wasn’t a serious situation.

How are doing with your health?

I am taking a day at a time. This is three years after. Like I said, I am taking one day at a time and thanking God and believing the best is yet to come. I am gradually, slowly but steadily recovering.

What are you working on presently?

I was working on a project with Nomoreloss before he died. The project is a talent hunt to raise up and coming musicians yearly, that is what I am working on. In fact, that was the last thing we were working on before his demise.

How will you describe the music industry since you came back?

I will say it is dynamic even before I left. I will say the music industry is getting there but it is there.


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